US-China technology transfers

China’s strategies (for tech transfer) range from setting up science parks for Chinese returnees to persuading foreign companies to open research centers in China, Hannas, Mulvenon and Puglisi said….
The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property concluded in May that technology theft amounted to a loss of more than $300 billion a year, the equivalent of total annual United States exports to Asia. “Virtually every sector and technology is attacked,” the commission said.
“National industrial policy goals in China encourage IP theft, and an extraordinary number of Chinese in business and government entities are engaged in this practice,” said the report by the commission, which was led by Dennis C. Blair, a former director of national intelligence, and Jon M. Huntsman Jr., a former ambassador to China….
One, the Shanghai New High Technology Service Center, offers “one-stop shopping” for government and business customers. Another, the Shanghai National Technology Transfer Center, has about 7,500 employees spread across laboratories, research institutes and offices in the region who are engaged in the “conversion” of foreign technology, including in microelectronics, lasers and nuclear technology, the authors wrote.
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8-2-10  A report released by The U.S. Chamber of Commerce said China was abusing the allure of its vast market to push foreign companies to transfer their latest technologies to Chinese competitors. This was a “blueprint for technology theft on a scale the world has never seen before,” it said. The report only adds to the strength of claims and concerns by foreign businesses and governments over Chinese policies and market restrictions….
“The belief by foreign companies that large financial investments, the sharing of expertise and significant technology transfers would lead to an ever-opening China market is being replaced by boardroom banter that win-win in China means China wins twice,” the report said.  http://economyincrisis.org/content/china-forcing-train-technology-transfer
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 In July 2011, under mounting pressure from foreign companies, governments, and commercial interest groups like the American and European Union Chambers of Commerce, the policy of “forcing” foreign companies to transfer their IP to Chinese companies in order to bid for government contracts was officially abolished.
Regardless of such policy-mandated restrictions, Chinese companies face no shortage of sophisticated suitors. If one company is unwilling to share its technology, others will. This is evident in the numbers. According to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, in 2011 the number of newly-approved foreign-funded enterprises in China was 27,712, and foreign investment increased 9.72 percent year-on-year to a little more than US$116 billion. For most large companies the risk of not getting into the Chinese market is bigger than the risk of sharing technology…. 
Another common criticism of China’s technology policies is that many of the transfers occur through corporate espionage. Despite international laws like the WTO’s “Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of International Property Rights (TRIPS),” which requires all members to meet a minimum level of IP protection and enforcement, technology is illegally transferred. However, most of the technology transferred to China by international companies moves through legal channels like joint ventures, patent licenses, and mergers and acquisitions.  http://www.china-briefing.com/news/2012/09/03/on-the-fast-track-technology-transfer-in-china.html
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4-18-11 
“People in the tech community are happy with what Hu Jintao committed to,” says John Neuffer, vice president of global policy at the Information Technology Industry Council, a trade group. “But like anything in China, it’s whether it’s implemented or not.”
“They are letting provincial authorities do their own thing,” adds an executive with a U.S. manufacturer. One province may accept his bid, he says, but another may reject it as not meeting China’s requirement that innovation be done in China—the technology-transfer imperative. “You have to fight it in every province. It’s like punching at a cloud.”    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748704547604576263060096988604
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Keys
November 22, 2013     To China, the most important tech transfer has come from Russia – military defense technology, as evidenced by large Chinese orders for the Flankers and its derivatives, engines, and missiles. Russia is far ahead of the US and Europe in missile technology. The Sukhois are superior to the best fighters in US arsenal.
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Socrates
November 21, 2013    The West and US capitalists are to be blamed for China s’rise to world power position as of today .Therefore, the only way to weaken China political power is to weaken its economy clout by DRAMATICALLY REDUCING investment, technology transfer to China and diverting investment and technology transfer to India and Asean countries.
China economy can not afford further GDP slow growth to less than 7%
Russia can tolerate the West and US economical isolation in the short term only. It can not survive in long term if the West and US keep economic isolating for such longer term such as 20-30 years .
Deng’s famous quote about the color of the cat can be interpreted in the following way: In order for China to become a “superpower” it has to go through an economic and technological “Great Economic Leapfrog Forward”. Deng wanted technology transfer from the West. Russian communism wasn’t really helping the Chinese economy too much (except for some ballet lessons LOL) so China has to choose the other cat (and that Russian-hater Kissinger agreed). Well, in the ’90′s, many people in the West (especially CEO’s and Wall Street guys) are so naive (or perhaps they were just out-smarting themselves?) that they thought they can make a “quick dirty buck” out of the huge Chinese market and labor force, but look, who’s got all the cash now? China! That’s actually not even the main thing for China. What they really wanted was technology transfer and they got it big time (through offering cheap labor). Perhaps they would have gotten that by hook or by crook (industrial espionage) someday anyway, but the faulty economic and political decisions made in the West expedited those Chinese goals. China is a big and ambitious dragon and we will all have to wait and see what the economic, political and environmental effects will be, of this immense amount of cash and technology transfer for the rest of the world. After giving away valuable and fundamental know-how and technology for short term gains (for little optic-fibre-transmitted-high-frequency-nano-blips in the stock market), it is hard for the capitalists in the West to complain that the Chinese are now capable of cloning (or reverse-engineering as the Chinese would call it) any high-tech product, including weapons, from the West.  http://thediplomat.com/2013/11/russia-as-a-u-s-china-battleground-state-3/
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12-24-13 
Secret U.S. missile and electro-optics technology was transferred to China recently by Israel, prompting anger from the U.S. and causing a senior Israeli defense official to resign.
The head of defense exports for the Israeli Defense Ministry resigned after a U.S. investigation concluded that technology, including a miniature refrigeration system manufactured by Ricor and used for missiles and in electro-optic equipment, was sent to China, according to the Israeli newspaper Maariv.
Another Israeli news site, Aretz Sheva, reports the U.S. is concerned the technology could ultimately find its way to Iran, which last year sought to buy military equipment from China for its nuclear program.

Read more: http://defensetech.org/2013/12/24/report-israel-passes-u-s-military-technology-to-china/#ixzz2rjKcANJv
Defense.org

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