surveillance past, present and unfolding

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97.  Surveillance must be very vigilant, but it must not appear as a sign of mistrust.  One must transform control into cooperation and reciprocal information.  Measures of trust and refinement of quality must be introduced from top to bottom.  Many useful measures have been condemned and destroyed only because of hatred of supervision.  Of course ignorance is the cause of such lack of goal-fitness.     -Morya:  Fiery World 1934

178.  The weak-minded also need surveillance.  Madness is contagious.  Weak-mindedness in childhood indicates subsequent abnormality through the entire life. People are agreed that the conditions of life are unhealthy; yet in spite of this, every advice about improving conditions for health will meet with hostility.  -Morya:  Brotherhood 1937

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HONG KONG, Aug. 6 — Pro-Beijing lawmakers approved legislation here today giving broad authority to the police to conduct covert surveillance, including wiretapping phones, bugging homes and offices and monitoring e-mail.
The bill passed the 60-member Legislative Council on a vote of 32 to 0 soon after pro-democracy lawmakers walked out of the chamber in protest early this morning.
http://www.nytimes. com/2006/ 08/06/world/ asia/06cnd- hong.html? ex=1312516800&en=7dfae1a64376a9f1&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss
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 2-22-06         Never before have the Chinese robbed the West of so much and such sensitive merchandise. Fully 70 percent of all illegal copycat products come from Asia, and most of that comes from China, in what has mushroomed into a $300 billion market. And the issue is no longer just a pair of poorly copied Adidas running shoes or a plastic version of a Gucci watch. More recently, the Chinese and others have taken to pirating expensive, high-tech knowledge, allowing them to duplicate entire machines and systems.  http://service.spiegel.de/cache/international/spiegel/0,1518,402464,00.html
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2004:   In short, ‘s great uncertainties surround China’s political and strategic future, and China is one of the few countries whose future matters greatly to the United States. Consequently, the security implications of U.S. economic policies toward China should trouble all Americans. Although China’s future posture is highly uncertain, it is only a slight exaggeration to say that U.S. policy towards China has been to transfer money and militarily useful technology to the People’s Republic as fast as possible. The enormous and rapidly growing trade surpluses China has run in recent years with the United States have sent more than $600 billion in hard currency earnings to China since 1996 alone. That figure is equivalent to 6 percent of total current annual U.S. economic output. This mountain of money can only greatly expand the resources available to the Chinese military. As long as this vast U.S. subsidy to the entire Chinese economy continues, moreover, China will be able to avoid many hard choices between guns and butter.
U.S. technology transfers to China potentially are more worrisome, as they could well enable China to take charge of its own technological development. Not only could China’s military development proceed free of all external constraints. China’s capacity to export weapons of mass destruction and their associated technologies would be liberated as well. http://energycommerce.house.gov/108/Hearings/03312004hearing1239/Tonelson1917.htm
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 Compiled by Chinese venture capital (VC) research and consulting firm Zero2IPO, the fourth annual survey found 60 firms made 253 investments totalling $1.269 billion (US) in China mainland or mainland-related enterprises in 2004.
The rapid growth in the world’s fascination with all things Chinese also is evident by the number of deals increasing more than 43 percent over last year. The survey results mark the first time the total has surpassed $1 billion, with total funds increasing by 28 percent over the prior year.
According to Zero2IPO, the Information and Computer (IC) industry received the bulk of the investments, reporting $424 million with a primary focus on IC design. Telecommunication firms captured 12 percent of the total, while 14 percent was invested in firms in the “traditional” industry sector. The Shanghai region received the greatest number of deals and highest investment amount, followed by Beijing.
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 Oct ’05:       Administrator of the US National Nuclear Security Administration, Linton Brooks, told China Daily: “There is no reason why the (reactor) technology should not be transferred to a country like China.”
Industry insiders said the commitment from Brooks, who is also undersecretary of the US Department of Energy, is expected to boost US nuclear power company Westinghouse’s attempts to win a US$8-billion contract to build four nuclear reactors at Sanmen in Zhejiang Province and Guangdong Province’s Yangjiang.
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6-28-13  Intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden is likely to reveal much more information about the global surveillance programs of the US National Security Agency, WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange says.

”I believe we will see a lot more detail, a lot more information,” Mr Assange said on Friday.

He said Mr Snowden’s disclosures of US signals intelligence and internet surveillance programs published by The Guardian and The Washington Post offered a ”bird’s-eye perspective” but the fine detail was essential for the leaks to achieve lasting political impact.

”We’ve seen matters at a high level. Now we need to go down to the level of countries, organisations and individuals, so they can see that they have been specifically targeted or caught up in the NSA’s dragnet surveillance.”

http://www.smh.com.au/world/more-nsa-surveillance-leaks-on-way-says-assange-20130628-2p2jg.html#ixzz2XZYqldGw

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WELLINGTON 6-26-13  (Reuters) – New Zealand is pushing to change its laws to widen surveillance of citizens by one of its spy agencies, despite growing global concern over the scope and security of such activities following damning revelations of monitoring by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA).  http://news.yahoo.com/zealand-wants-wider-spy-agency-role-keeping-tabs-050236816.html;_ylt=AwrNUbCDVM5RxBMAQbzQtDMD
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NSA surveillance may be legal — but it’s unconstitutional

By Laura K. Donohue,June 21, 2013

Laura K. Donohue is a professor at Georgetown University Law Center and director of Georgetown’s Center on National Security and the Law.

The National Security Agency’s recently revealed surveillance programs undermine the purpose of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which was established to prevent this kind of overreach. They violate the Fourth Amendment’s guarantee against unreasonable search and seizure. And they underscore the dangers of growing executive power.

The intelligence community has a history of overreaching in the name of national security. In the mid-1970s, it came to light that, since the 1940s, the NSA had been collecting international telegraphic traffic from companies, in the process obtaining millions of Americans’ telegrams that were unrelated to foreign targets. From 1940 to 1973, the CIA and the FBI engaged in covert mail-opening programs that violated laws prohibiting the interception or opening of mail. The agencies also conducted warrantless “surreptitious entries,” breaking into targets’ offices and homes to photocopy or steal business records and personal documents. The Army Security Agency intercepted domestic radio communications. And the Army’s CONUS program placed more than 100,000 people under surveillance, including lawmakers and civil rights leaders.

After an extensive investigation of the agencies’ actions, Congress passed the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) to limit sweeping collection of intelligence and create rigorous oversight. But 35 years later, the NSA is using this law and its subsequent amendments as legal grounds to run even more invasive programs than those that gave rise to the statute.

We’ve learned that in April, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) orderedVerizon to provide information on calls made by each subscriber over a three-month period. Over the past seven years, similar orders have been served continuously on AT&T, Sprint and other telecommunications providers.

Another program, PRISM, disclosed by the Guardian and The Washington Post, allows the NSA and the FBI to obtain online data including e-mails, photographs, documents and connection logs. The information that can be assembledabout any one person — much less organizations, social networks and entire communities — is staggering: What we do, think and believe.

The government defends the programs’ legality, saying they comply with FISA and its amendments….

This means that FISA can now be used to gather records concerning individuals who are neither the target of any investigation nor an agent of a foreign power. Entire databases — such as telephony metadata — can be obtained, as long as an authorized investigation exists.

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-06-21/opinions/40110321_1_electronic-surveillance-fisa-nsa-surveillance

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It’s not just the government that can spy on you.  Surveillance hardware and software have never been better or more affordable.

What’s more, the legal regulations concerning digital privacy are incomplete, inconsistently interpreted, and lag behind the rapid pace of technological advancement.

In other words, there’s never been a better time to be the spy next door.

The distance between what’s possible and what’s permissible is vast and ever-changing. How far can you go?     http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2013/06/24/spy-next-door-private-surveillance-has-never-been-easier/#ixzz2XZbpIIae

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